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^ ^ North Carolina State Library ^^^ 

I''I3Z0 ''''''' 

^•/2 SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



North Carolina Sanatorium for the 
Treatment of Tuberculosis 

UNDER CONTROL OF STATE HOARD OF HEALTH 

SANATORIUM, N. C. 
1920 




SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



North Carolina Sanatorium for the 
Treatment of Tuberculosis 

UNDER CONTROL OF STATE BOARD OF HEALTH 

SANATORIUM, N. C. 
1920 




RALEIGH, N. C. 

Edwaeds & Broughton Printing Company 

State Printers 

1923 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Personnel: 

Members State Board of Health 5 

Extension Department 5 

Directors, North Carolina Tuberculosis Association 6 

Letter of Transmittal 7 

A Doleful Tale — but the sun still shines 9 

Summary of Year's Work 11 

Literature of the Bureau of Tuberculosis 14 

Medical Report 15 

Statistics, 1920 18 

Organizations Supporting Patients at Sanatorium 27 

Financial Statement, 1920 28 

Annual Report of North Carolina Tuberculosis Association: 

Officers and Board of Directors 40 

Report 41 

Report of Audit 53 



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in 2011 with funding from 
State Library of North Carolina 



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NORTH CAROLINA SANATORIUM 

FOR THE TREATMENT OF TUBERCULOSIS 

(Under the Control of the State Board of Health) 



PERSONNEL 

MEaiBERS STATE BOARD OF HEALTH 

Dr. J. Howell Way, President Waynesville 

Dr. Richard H. Lewis Raleigh. 

Col. J. L. Ludlow Winston-Salem 

Dr. a. J. Crowexl Charlotte 

Dr. Thomas E. Anderson Statesville 

Dr. Charles O'H. Laughinghouse Greenville 

E. J. Tucker, D.D.S Roxboro 

Dr. F. R. Harris Henderson 

Dr. Cyrus Thompson Jacksonville 

Dr. W. S. Rankin, Secretary State Board of Health and State 
Health Officer, Raleigh, N. C. 



Superintendent L. B. McBrayer, M. D., F. A. C. P. 

Assistant Superintendent P. P. McCain. A. B., M. D. 

Assistant Physician and Director of Laboratories. . .R. McBrayer, A.B., M.D. 

Assistant Physician J. L. Spruill. M.D. 

Private Secretary to Superintendent A. W. Snow 

Head Nurse Miss Mamie O'Kelly 

Head Nurse, Assistant Miss E. Connolly 

Cashier j_ M. Clark 



EXTE?fSIO?f DEPARTMENT OF THE NORTH CAROLINA SANATORIUM 
FOR THE TREATMENT OF TUBERCULOSIS 

Bureau of Tuberculosis, State Board of Health 

Director L. B. McBrayer, M. D.. F. A. C. P. 

Assistant Director P. P. McCain, A.B., M.D. 

Office Secretary A. W. Snow 

Stenographer Miss L. Bouldin 

Stenographer Miss L. Mayhugh 

Stenographer Miss S. Brabble 

Director Organization and Education Among the 

Negroes Mrs. Florence C. Williams 

[5] 



NORTH CAROLOA TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION 

DIRECTORS 



Mrs. Gordon Finger, Pres. 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

Mrs. Chas. R. Whitaker, Yice Pres. 

HBNDERSONVILLE, N. C. 

Dr. L. B. McBrayer, Ex. 8e&y, 
sanatorium, n. c. 

Dr. Otho Ross, 

charlotte, n. c. 

Mrs. Ctjthbert Martin, 
wilmington, n. c. 

Mrs. W. N. Hutt, 
candor, n. c. 

Mrs. T. D. Jones, 

durham, n. c. 

Dr. C. L. Minor, 

ashevllle, n. c. 



Mrs. C. C. Hook, 

charlotte, n. c. 

Dr. W. L. Dunn, 

asheville, n. c. 

Col. J. L. Ludlow, 

winston-salem, n. 

Mrs. Mark Quinnerly, 
greenville, n. c. 

Mrs. S. H. Brown, 
oxford, n. c. 

Mrs. J. L. Wetmore, 

ARDEN, N. C. 

Mr. Hamilton C. Jones, 
charlotte, n. c. 

Mrs. R. C. Warren, 
gastonia, n. c. 



A. W. Snow, Asst. Secretary 
Dr. E. T. Ranscjm, Moving Picture ExhiMtor and Lecturer 



[6] 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 



Dr. W. S. Rankin, Secretary, 

State Board of Health, 

Raleigh, N. G. 

My Dear Doctor: — I hereby transmit to you, and througL. you to 

the State Board of Health and the Governor and General Assembly, 

a report for the year 1920, being the seventh annual report of the 

N'orth Carolina Sanatorium for the Treatment of Tuberculosis. 

Yery respectfully yours, 

L. B. McBrayer, 

Superintendent. 



171 



■% 



A DOLEFUL TALE— BUT THE SUN STILL SHINES 

This has been perhaps the most trying year in some respects the 
institution has had — the general unrest, the disinclination of most 
laboring people to work, has made it very difficult to secure sufficient 
employees to properly handle the place. As an example, it cost the 
Sanatorium $147.00 in traveling expenses, one month, to replace the 
turnover in help, and then the help was not sufficient in amount or 
satisfactory in service. 

The psychology of the after-the-war unrest affected the patients, 
too, to a small extent comparatively. We have been caring for an 
average of forty ex-serAace men since the beginning of the necessity 
for such treatment, and have had splendid results and little trouble 
until the last year. The men we • are getting now do not seem to be 
interested in getting well of tuberculosis, the large amount of compen- 
sation they are receiving seeming to add to that attitude, and they 
are, without knowing it, interfering with the treatment of civilian 
patients. We feel that we have discharged our obligation to the tu- 
berculous ex-service men and that the United States Government is 
now prepared to give them proper care, and with the approval of 
our Board we will in the very near future cease to admit ex-service 
men and will not renew our agreement with the United States Public 
Health Service. We have been glad to render them this service un- 
til such time as the United States Government was prepared to take 
care of them. 

Since we have been caring for the tuberculous ex-service men we 
have had two agencies that have been very helpful, (1) Occupational 
Therapy by the Federal Board for Vocational Education, and we were 
one of the first two institutions in the United States to put in this 
service, and (2) The Medical Social Service of the American Red 
Cross. Both of these will cease when we cease to admit ex-service men 
for the United States Public Health Service. 

Our religious services have continued about as usual. Sunday 
school every Sunday evening and mid-week prayer-meeting, con- 
ducted by the patients, with such help as they needed from the staff. 
We also have an occasional service by a minister, and we are espe- 
cially indebted to Rev. Mr. T. E. White of the Christian Church, 
Sanford, who has come once every month and spent the whole day, 
visiting with the patients confined to bed during the morning hours 
and holding service in the afternoon. Miss Grace MacKinnon, a 
trained nurse of Bennettsville, S. C, has been sending money to buy 

[91 



10 Annual Report, 1920 

literature for the Sunday school for several years. Entertainment 
has been usually sufficient. The Woman's Club of Sanatorium has 
provided many pleasant evenings, the patients themselves usually 
forming the caste for the plays. Mrs. Leonard Tufts, of Pinehurst, 
brought over one afternoon each week during the winter some splendid 
entertainment ; for example, Miss Annie Oakley gave an exhibition of 
her expert shooting; Mr. Edgar A. Guest recited some of his own pro- 
ductions, etc., etc. The ladies from Carthage have given a few de- 
lightful concerts. Many others have contributed to the pleasure and 
entertainment of the patients. 

Our building program has gone along, though very slowly; the un- 
rest and disinclination to work showing "its effect markedly in this 
work. 

We could not close without expressing appreciation for the loyalty 
and cooperation of those employees who have stood by the institution 
and us through all the turmoil of war and its aftermath. From cooks, 
waiters and orderlies all the way up to the staff there have been some 
that were faithful and dependable always. 

On the whole our work has progressed along all lines. The results 
of our treatment have continued good, very good, and the influence 
of our work throughout the State is rapidly becoming deeper and 
wider and more far-reaching. The decrease in the actual number of 
deaths in the State by more than 30% in seven years is eloquent 
testimony. 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. B, McBrater, 
Superintendent. 



SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF 

THE NORTH CAROLINA SANATORIUM FOR THE 
TREATMENT OF TUBERCULOSIS 

UNDER CONTROL OF 

THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH 

SANATORIUM, N. C. 



SUMMARY OF YEAR'S WORK 

OF THE NORTH CAROLINA SANATORIUM (INCLUDING THE 
EXTENSION DEPARTMENT, 1920 



Letters and postals received 36,862 

Letters written: 

Individual 14,269 

Multigraph 61,416 

Total 75,685 

Articles written (approximate number words) : 

Newspaper 9,835 

Bulletin 23,000 

Official pamphlets 20,950 

Other publications 21,200 

Articles copied 280,082 

Total 355,067 

Forms and placards prepared 190 

Total number copies of forms and placards 89,249 

Blank cards mailed for reporting cases of tuberculosis 4,067 

Number cases reported: 

White 1,883 

Black 1,412 

Total ; 3,295 

Literature: 

Pieces sent to reported cases 10,761 

Other literature sent out 72,153 

Sample Crusade Literature sent 11,050 

Crusade literature sent for pupils 21,283 

Total 115,247 

[11] 



12 Annual Report, 1920 

Sputum cups distributed 168,906 

Tuberculin sent physicians for von Pirquet diagnostic test 245 

Blanks for reporting results of von Pirquet diagnostic test 245 

Patients' histories written (312); approximate number words.... 304,291 

Envelopes addressed 80,781 

Lantern and illustrated slide lectures loaned 24 

Number of weeks in use 59 

Total audience 12,650 

Films loaned (health subjects) 6 

Number times exhibited 14 

Total audience 1,700 

Dr. L. B. McBrayer: 

Addresses delivered 23 

Total audiences 3,025 

Conferences with local authorities 207 

Days out of office 75 

Dr. P. P. McCain: 

Attended National Tuberculosis Association and the American 
Sanatorium Association at Saranac Lake, and spent 3 days 
investigating the Trudeau School of Tuberculosis and the 
Trudeau Laboratory and X-Ray Departments. 

Total number days out of office (including 6 days on vacation) 22 

Total audiences 400 

Conferences held 19 

Consultations 24 

Clinics visited : 

Sanatoria visited 

Dr. J. L. Spruill: 

County clinics held 12 

Patients examined 1,014 

Addresses 33 

Total audiences 5,146 

Conferences 13 

Number of outside patients examined 826 



Summary of Work Among the Negroes 

Lanterns and illustrated slide lectures loaned 17 

Number of weeks loaned 53 

Total audience 12.710 

Modern Health Crusaders enrolled 12,000 

Number reached by Mrs. Williams and 45 colored supervisors 256.569 

Number present at health moving picture entertainments during 

811. months, from March 15, 1920, to November 30, 1920 46,815 

Exhibits: 

Southern Conference on Tuberculosis, Jacksonville, Florida 

Sandhill fair. 

Number patients December 1, 1919 125 

Number patients admitted 296 

Number patients discharged 308 

Number patients December 1, 1920 : 113 

Number hospital days : 41,118 

State appropriation, maintenance $50,000 

Cost per patient per day to State $1.12 



The JSToeth Carolina Sanatorium 13 

Appropriations, 1919: 

Maintenance $50,000.00 

Extension 14,000.00 

Total $64,000.00 

Appropriations, 1920: 

Maintenance $50,000.00 

Extension 15,000.00 

Extra to cover deficit 5,000.00 

Total ■ $70,000.00 



LITERATURE OF THE BUREAU OF TUBERCULOSIS OF 
THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF HEALTH 



Title of Bulletin 

Bulletin No. 61 — How to Care for a Tuberculosis Patient. 

Bulletin No. 70— TUBERCULOSIS: (A. M. A. Bulletin). 

Bulletin No. 9-2 — An Act to Prevent the Convicts or Prisoners of North 
Carolina from Contracting Tuberculosis. 

Bulletin No. 117 — -Tuberculosis: Its Symptoms, Prevention and Cure. 
Bulletin No. 129 — County Tuberculosis Problem. 
Bulletin No. 157 — The Problem of the Returned Tuberculous Soldier- 
Bulletin No. 1000 — If There Is To Be Democratic Equality of Opportunity 
•There Must Be An Equal Opportunity for Health. 

Bulletin No. 1001— Murder! (Perfectly Legal.) 
Bulletin No. 1002— Carry 'On. 

Bulletin No. 1003^ — Fundamental Principles of Public Health Nursing. 
The Next to Go. 
The Story of Four Generations. 
Is Your Muffler Working or Your Cut-out Open? 
They are Dead. 
Camouflage. 
U-Boat. 

After the "Flu," What?— "Watch Your Step." 

The Incidence and the Importance of Pleurisy in Early Tuberculosis, 
by Dr. P. P. McCain, Sanatorium, N. C. 

A Plea for An Earlier Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis by the 
General Practitioner, by Dr. J. H. Way, Waynesville, N. C. 

The Diagnosis of Early Pulmonary Tuberculosis for the General Prac- 
titioner, by Dr. S. E. Thompson, Carlsbad, Texas. 

A Modern Prophecy, by Dr. Benj. K. Hays, Oxford, N. C. 

The Infectiousness of Tuberculosis, by Dr. T. D. Coleman, Augusta, Ga. 

Importance of the Whole-time Health Officer and the Whole-time Health 
Nurse in the Campaign Against Tuberculosis and All Preventable Diseases, 
by Dr. L. B. McBrayer, Sanatorium, N. C. 

Tuberculosis: A Lecture for Teachers. 

Tuberculosis Program for North Carolina. 

Moving Picture Service. 

Health Work Among the Negroes. 

Halt! You Are Under Arrest. 

The Slate of the General Assembly. 



[14] 



MEDICAL REPORT 



DEFINITIONS OF TERMS EMPLOYED 

On Admission 

These definitions indicate the furthest extent of disease and the greatest 
severity of symptoms that a patient can present and still belong to the stage 
defined. All patients beyond the incipient stage fall under the moderately 
advanced stage, unless the physical signs and symptoms exceed those of the 
moderately advanced stage, when they should be classified as far advanced. 

Incipient. 

Slight or no constitutional symptoms (including, particularly, gas- 
tric or intestinal disturbance or rapid loss of weight). Slight or 
no elevation of temperature or acceleration of pulse at any time 
during the twenty-four hours. 

Expectoration usually small in amount or absent. Tubercle bacilli 
may be present or absent. 

Slight infiltration limited to the apex of one or both lungs or a 
small part of one lobe. 

No tuberculous complications. 

Moderately Advanced. 

No marked impairment of function, either local or constitutional. 
Localized consolidation moderate in extent with little or no evi- 
dence of cavity formation; or infiltration more extensive than under 
incipient. No serious complications. 

Far Advanced. 

Marked impairment of function, local and constitutional. 
Marked consolidation of entire lobe. 
Or disseminated areas of beginning cavity formation. 
Or serious complications. 

Miliary Tuberculosis. 

On Discharge 
Arrested. 

All constitutional symptoms and expectoration with bacilli absent 
for a period of six months; the physical signs to be those of a healed 
lesion. 

Apparently Arrested. 

All constitutional symptoms and expectoration with bacilli absent 
for a period of three months; the physical signs to be those of a 
healed lesion. 

Quiescent. 

Absence of all constitutional symptoms, expectoration and bacilli 
may or may not be present; physical signs stationary or retrogres- 
sive. The foregoing conditions to have existed for at least two 
months. 

[151 



16 Annual Keport^ 1920 

Improved. 

Constitutional symptoms lessened or entirely absent; physical signs 
improved or unchanged; cough and expectoration with bacilli usually 
present. 

Unimproved. 

All essential symptoms and signs unabated or increased. 

Terms Used in Definition of "Incipie2^t" 

1. Slight Constitutional Disturbance. 

Slight loss of appetite, of strength, of weight; lassitude; possibly 
slight acceleration of pulse or possibly slight elevation of temperature. 
The impairment of health may be so slight that the patient does not 
look or feel sick in the ordinary sense of the word. 

2. Slight Elevation of Temperature. 

Maximum temperature after rest for one hour, never goes 99.5 to 
100 degrees F. by mouth (or 100.5 per rectum). 

3. Slight Acceleration of Pulse. 

Maximum pulse rate not over 90 after rest for one hour, sitting or 
lying, except when due to causes other than tuberculosis. 

4. Absence of Tubercle Bacilli. 

Each monthly examination (if the sputum be negative) to consist 
of a careful microscopic examination, with a mechanical stage, of two 
smears, devoting at least three minutes to each smear, made from 
selected particles (at least six from different parts) of the sputum 
on each of three successive days. The morning sputum should always 
be obtained, or, better, the minute bits that some arrested patients 
raise at very infrequent intervals. It is not yet deemed wise to in- 
sist on digestion and centrifugalization, or inoculation of guinea 
pigs. 

5. Infiltration. 

Physical signs of slight prominence of the clavicle, lessened move- 
ment of chest, narrowing of apical resonance with lessened movement 
of base of lung, slight or no change in resonance, distant or loud and 
harsh breathing, with or without some change in the rhythm (i. e., 
prolonged expiration); vocal resonance possibly slightly increased; 
or fine or moderately coarse rales present or absent. If sputum con- 
tains tubercle bacilli, any one of these. 

6. Apex. 

That portion of the lung situated above the clavicle and the third 
vertebral spine. 

7. Small Part of One Lobe. 

An area of one or two intercostal spaces, or an area not exceeding 
60 to 80 sq. cm. in extent, according to the size of the patient. 



The North Carolina Sanatorium 17 

Terms Used in Definition of "Moderatbh^y Advanced" 

8. Marked Impairment of Function, Either Local or Constitutional. 

Local: Marked dyspnea on exertion, limiting seriously the pa- 
tient's activity. 

Constitutional: Marked weakness, anorexia, tachycardia. 

9. Moderate Extent of Localized Consolidation. 

An area of one-half lobe or less, but may involve both apices; 
marked dullness, bronchial or decidedly broncho-vesicular breathing; 
markedly increased vocal resonance; rales usually present. These 
signs are to be sharply limited as to area instead of gradually shad- 
ing into normal physical signs. 

10. Evidences of Destruction of Tissue. 

Presence of tubercle bacilli or elastic fibers in the sputum or the 
presence of the physical signs of a cavity. There are no absolutely 
certain physical signs of cavity, but a combination of any four of 
the following signs is to be taken as indicative of a cavity: (1) 
cracked-pot note; (2) amphoric breathing; (3) intense whispering 
pectoriloquy; (4) a veiled puff or post-tussive suction; (5) bubbling 
or resonant rales. "Physical signs of softening" do not admit of any 
definition apart from that of cavity formation, and the terms should 
not be used. 

11. Disseminated Fibroid Deposits. 

More or less localized areas of fibrous tissue, producing on physical 
examination some change or dullness in the percussion note, more 
or less increase of vocal resonance, harsh, suppressed, or broncho- 
vesicular breathing, rales sibilant or sonorous usually, but at times 
fine and moderately coarse. 

12. Serious Complications. 

These should be limited to tuberculous complications, such as 
meningitis, pharyngitis, laryngitis (except slight thickening in the 
posterior interarytenoid space, and superficial ulceration of a vocal 
chord), enteritis, peritonitis, nephritis, cystitis, orchitis, adenitis 
(unless very slight), etc. 



MEDICAL REPORT 



STATISTICAL 1920 

Number patients to be reported on 311 

Number patients not tuberculous 18 

Number patients not classified 20 

Number patients in Sanatorium December 1, 1920 113 



Total number patients treated during year 

60 PATIENTS WHO STAYED LESS THAN 30 DAYS 



462 





Condition on Discharge 


Condition on Admission 


Arrested 


Apparently 
Arrested 


Quiescent 


Improved 


Unim- 
proved 


Died 


Incipient 20 

Moderately advanced. .20 

Far advanced ..20 

Acute tuberculosis 




















20 

17 

11 





3 
2 





7 



Totals 60 











48 


5 


7 



Average stay, 16.01 days. 



Longest stay, 29 days. 



Shortest stay, 2 days. 



Number Gained Weight, 35 


Number Lost Weight, 


11 




Average gain 


3.99 Lbs. 
. 8.5 Lbs. 
.5 Lb. 
7 


Average loss 




. 3.43 Lbs. 


Largest gain 


Largest loss 

Smallest loss 

Not weighed 




8. Lbs . 


Smallest gain 


. .75 Lb. 


Stationar3' 


7 



56 PATIENTS WHO STAYED FROM 30 TO 89 DAYS 





Condition on Discharge 


Condition on Admiission 


Arrested 


Apparently 
Arrested 


Quiescent 


Improved 


Unim- 
proved 


Died 


Incipient, _. 17 

Moderately advanced. ..26 

Far advanced.. ...13 

Acute tuberculosis 














7 
3 




10 
22 

7 





t 

4 






2 


Totals 56 








10 


39 


5 


2 



Average stay, 53.6 days. 



Longest stay, 88 days. 



Shortest stay, 30 days. 



Number Gained Weight, 


46 




Number Lost Wei 


?ht,8 




Average gain 


:;.: 


- 6.6 Lbs. 
.21. Lbs. 
. .5 Lb. 
1 


Average loss „ 




.. 3.8 Lbs. 


Largest gain 

Smallest gain . 


Large.st loss 

Smallest loss... 

Not weighed 




.. 8. Lbs. 
1. Lb. 


Stationary 


.... 


1 



[181 



The JSTorth Carolina Sanatorium 



19 



195 PATIENTS WHO STAYED 90 DAYS OR MORE 





Condition on Discharge 


Condition on Admission 


Arrested 


Apparently 
Arrested 


Quiescent 


Improved 


Unim- 
proved 


Died 


Incipient 63 

Moderately advanced... 78 

Ear advanced 54 

Acute tuberculosis 


17 
4 




25 
5 




19 

40 

10 




2 
15 

16 




14 
19 






9 



Totals 195 


21 


30 


69 


33 


33 


9 



Average stay, 206 days. 



Longest stay, 475 days. 



Shortest stay, 90 days. 



Number Gained Weight, 156 



Average gain 13.1 Lbs. 

Xargest gain 61. Lbs. 

Smallest gain 1. Lb. 

Stationary 8 



Number Lost Weight, 30 



Average loss 6.5 Lbs. 

Largest loss 22.5 Lbs. 

Smallest loss..- - 1. Lb. 

Not weighed. 1 



HISTORY OF HEMORRHAGE 

Negative - -187 

^Previous only _ - 104 

Positive < Previous and during residence 16 

\During residence only -- 4 

311 



RESULTS OF SPUTUM EXAMINATIONS 

Negative or no sputum 154 

^On admission - 145 

Positive "\ During residence - 135 

(,0n discharge --- - H^ 

551 



22 PATIENTS WHO TOOK THE TUBERCULIN TEST 

Positive - - -- 8 

Negative- - - - - -H 

22 



Sex 




Age 


Civil Condition 




-19 


20-29 


30-39 


40-49 


50-59 


60-1- 


Single 


Married 


Widowed 


Male- 

Female __ 


172 

139 

311 


8 
17 


97 
69 


53 
38 


11 
11 


1 
2 


2 
2 


112 
56 


54 
75 


6 
8 


Totals -.- 


25 


166 


91 


22 


3 


4 


168 


129 


14 



20 



AzsTNUAL Report, 1920 



COMPLICATIONS 



Anal fistula 4 

Arterial hypertension 1 

Arthritis 2 

Asthma 1 

Bronchiectasis 1 

Bronchitis 13 

Broncho-pneumonia 7 

Cervical adenitis 1 

Cystitis 1 

Dementia praecox , 1 

Emphysema 1 

Enteritis 10 

Gastroptosis 1 

Glossitis Tb 1 

Gonorrhoea 2 

Hookworm 16 



Hyperthyrodism 5 

Laryngitis 24 

Melancholia 2 

Mitral regurgitation 1 

Nephritis 3 

Orchitis 2 

Otitis media 4 

Pelvic peritonitis 1 

Peritonitis 2 

Pleurisy with effusion 4 

Pott's Disease 1 

Pregnancy 3 

Pyopneumothorax 1 

Salpingitis 1 

Syphilis 4 



OCCUPATIONS 



Bookkeepers 3 

Bricklayer 1 

Carpenter 1 

Cigar-maker 1 

City mail carrier 1 

Clerks in stores 7 

Community service director 1 

Cotton mill employees 13 

Electrician 1 

Farmers 15 

Fisherman 1 

Flagman 1 

Graduate nurses 3 

Hosiery mill employee 1 

Housekeeper 1 

Housewives 78 

House work at home 25 

Insurance 1 

Insurance agent 1 

Laborer 2 



Machinists 5 

Manufacturer 1 

Mattress finisher 1 

Merchants 2 

Milliners 3 

Music teacher 1 

Ofhce clerks S 

Peach packer 1 

Printer I 

Pupil nurses 2 

Railroad engineer 1 

Rural mail carrier 1 

Silk mill operator 1 

Soldiers 92 

Stenographers 4 

Students 20 

Tailor 1 

Teachers 3 

Traveling salesman 2 

United States Navy sailors 7 



The North Cakolina Sanatorium 



21 



TOWNS FROM WHICH PATIENTS CAME 



Abner 1 

Advance 2 

Ahoskie 1 

Aiken 1 

Apex 2 

Ararat 2 

Ashboro ... 1 

Asheville 3 

Aulander 1 

Bath 1 

Battleboro 1 

Belcross 1 

Belhaven 2 

Belmont 1 

Benson 1 

Bessemer City 2 

Bethel 1 

Big Laurel 1 

Boone 1 

Bostic 1 

Burlington 2 

Cabarrus 1 

Campbell 2 

Canton 1 

Cardenas 1 

Carthage 1 

Catawba 1 

Cedar Creek 2 

Cedar Grove 1 

Charlotte 9 

■Cliffside 1 

•Clinton 2 

Clyde 1 

Colerain 3 

Concord 5 

Conway 1 

•Corbett 1 

Cumberland 1 

Currie 1 

Denver 1 

Duke 1 

Dunn 1 

Durham 14 

Dysortville 1 

Eagle Springs 1 

East Bend 1 

East Lake 1 

Elizabeth City 6 

Elizabethtown 2 

Elkin 3 

Ellerbe 1 

Elm City 1 

Elon College 1 

Enfield 3 

Fallston 1 

Parmville 1 

Fayetteville 2 

Finley 1 

Forest City 1 



Four Oaks 1 

Pranklinton 1 

Garner 1 

Gastonia 1 

Gibson 1 

Godwin 1 

Goldsboro 1 

Greensboro 6 

Greenville 6 

Henderson 4 

Hickory 2 

High Point 9 

Hillsboro 3 

Kannapolis 2 

Kerr Station 1 

Kin.ston 2 

Laurinburg 1 

Lawndale 2 

Leaksville 1 

Lenoir 1 

Lester 1 

Lexington 1 

Lilesville 1 

Lincolnton 1 

Linville 1 

Linwood 1 

Louisburg 1 

Lumberton 2 

McKenzie, Tenn 1 

Macclesfield 1 

Mackeys 1 

Manson 1 

Marion 1 

Marshall 4 

Matthews 2 

Maxton 3 

Mayworth 1 

Merry Oaks 1 

Mocksville 1 

Monroe 1 

Mooresville 1 

Mount Airy 4 

Mount Gilead 1 

Mount Holly 1 

Mount Ulla 1 

Murfreesboro 1 

Murnhy 1 

Neuse 1 

New Bern 4 

Newport 1 

Newton Grove 1 

Niagara 1 

Pendleton 1 

Persimmon Creek ... 1 

Pinehurst 1 

Pinetown 1 

Plvmouth 1 

Polloksville 1 

Poplar Branch 1 

• 



Potecasi 2 

Proctor 1 

Prospect Hill [ i 

Raleigh g 

Randleman i 

Red Springs '. 2 

Reidsville i 

Revere i 

Rich Square i 

Roberdel i 

Robersonville i 

Rockford 2 

Rockingham 5 

Rocky Mount 5 

Ronda 1 

Rosehill i 

Rosemary i 

Salisbury 3 

Sanford 3 

Scotland Neck '.'. i 

Seaboard 1 

Seagrove 1 

Selma 1 

Shallotte ' .' 3 

Sharon, Tenn i 

Siler City i 

Smithfield 1 

Snow Hill 1 

Sophia 2 

Spray 1 

Spring Creek 1 

Springdale 1 

Spring Hope 4 

Stacy 1 

Staley 1 

Stanfield i 

Statesville 1 

Summerfield 1 

Swepsonville 1 

Tabor 1 

Tarboro 2 

Thomasville 1 

Tobaccoville 1 

Trenton 1 

Vanceboro 1 

Vandemere 1 

Wadesboro 1 

Wake Forest 1 

Walnut Cove 2 

Washington 2 

Waynesville 1 

West Durham 1 

Westfield 1 

Wilmington 6 

Wilson 2 

Windsor 1 

Winston-Salem 4 

Woodland 1 

Youngsville 2 



22 



Annual Eepoet, 1920 



LIST OF COUNTIES FROM WHICH PATIENTS CAME 



Alamance 4 

Anson 2 

Avery 1 

Beaufort 6 

Bertie 5 

Bladen 2 

Brunswick 3 

Buncombe 3 

Cabarrus 8 

Caldwell 4 

Camden 1 

Carteret 2 

Caswell 2 

Catawba 3 

Chatham 2 

Cherokee 2 

Cleveland 3 

Columbus 1 

Craven 5 

Cumberland 6 

Currituck 1 

Dare 1 

Davidson 3 

Davie 3 

Duplin 1 

Durham 15 



Edgecombe 8 

Forsyth 5 

Franklin 4 

Gaston 7 

Greene 1 

Guilford 16 

Halifax 5 

Harnett 2 

Haywood 4 

Hertford 2 

Iredell 2 

Johnston 4 

Jones 2 

Lee 3 

Lincoln 2 

McDowell 2 

Madison 7 

Martin 1 

Mecklenburg 11 

Montgomery 2 

Moore 4 

Nash 5 

New Hanover 6 

Northampton 7 

Orange 4 



Pamlico 1 

Pasquotank & 

Pender 1 

Pitt & 

Randolph & 

Richmond 7 

Robeson T 

Rockingham 3 

Rowan 4 

Rutherford 3 

Sampson 4 

Scotland 2 

Stanly 1 

Stokes 4 

Surry 12 

Swain 1 

Union 1 

Vance 4r 

Wake 14 

Warren 2 

Washington 2 

Watauga 1 

Wayne 1 

Wilkes 2 

Wilson 3 

Yadkin 1 



The North Carolina Sanatorium 23 

SUMMARY MEDICAL REPORT DECEMBER 1, 1919, to NOVEMBER 30, 1920 

Patients admitted: 

Incipient 100 

Moderately advanced 124 

Far advanced 87 

Not classiiied 20 

Not tuberculous 18 

Total 349 

Patients discharged: 

Arrested 21 

Apparently arrested 30 

Quiescent 79 

Improved 120 

Unimproved 43 

Died 18 

Not tuberculous 18 

Not classified 20 

Total 349 

Hospital days 41,189 



LABORATORY REPORT 

Sputa: (Miks.) 1,632 

(Chem.) 54 

Urinalysis: (Miks.) 694 

(Chem.) 1,319 

24-hour specimens 53 

Blood counts: 

W. B. C. Dif. counts 53 

W. B. C. counts 150 

R. B. C. counts 80 

Hemoglobin 73 

Color index 52 

Arneth 24 

Complete count 32 

Malaria 9 

Wassermann 76 

Cultures 11 

Widal 10 

Smears for Plasmodia 7 

Pleural fluid 17 

Pleural pus 3 

Feces 489 

Gastric 37 

Vaginal smears 15 

Autogenous vaccines 1 

Fistula discharge 7 

Urethral discharge 7 

Pus from ear 1 

Total 4,872 



24 



Annual Report, 1920 



PRESENT CONDITION OF ALL INCIPIENT PATIENTS DISCHARGED FROM 
THE SANATORIUM PREVIOUS TO JUNE 30, 1920 



Condition on 


Condition November 30, 1920 






Years Discharged 






Discharge 


1914 


1915 


1916 


1917 


1918 


1919 


1920 


Total 


Arrested 
47 


Living and working __ 

Living and not working 

Dead 


1 





4 





5 





12 
1 





5 






5 

1 




10 
3 




42 
5 





Lost 











Apparently 
Arrpstpd 


Living and working 

Living and not working 

Dead 


1 
1 




5 

1 
I 



30 
1 
1 



33 

2 



1 


30 
2 





28 
6 

1 



11 
2 




138 

15 

3 


157 


Lost - - 


1 








Quiescent 
80 


Living and working ._. 

Living and not working 

Dead - 


5 





4 

5 
1 

4 

1 



10 

2 

1 


11 
1 



13 
1 





13 

4 

1 


6 

2 





62 
8 
7 




Lost 


3 








Improved 
67 


Living and working 

Living and not working 

Dead 


1 



1 


1 

2 



2 


13 

1 
1 
1 


9 
1 

2 




9 
4 




3 

1 




50 
9 
4 




host 


4 


Unimproved 
4 


Living and working 

Living and not working.. _, 
Dead - 














1 





1 

\ 









1 











3 

1 




Lost : 





Total 
355 


Living and working 

Living an 1 not working 

D^ad 


8 
I 



1 


17 
1 
1 

1 


57 
3 
3 
3 


70 
5 
2 
2 


57 
4 

2 




56 

15 

1 

1 


30 
8 




295 

37 

15 

8 






1 





The Xorth Carolina Sanatorium 



25 



PRESENT CONDITION OF ALL MODERATELY ADVANCED PATIENTS DISCHARGED 
FROM THE SANATORIUM PREVIOUS TO JUNE 30, 1920 



Condition on 


Condition November 30, 1920 


Years Discharged 


Discharge 


1914 


1915 


1916 


1917 


1918 


1919 


1920 


Total 


Arrested 
20 


Living and working 

Living and not working 

Dead 








4 





7 





1 
2 





1 





I 





1 
3 





15 
5 





Lost 





Apparently 

Arrested 

50 


Living and working 

Living and not working 

Dead 


3 


1 



1 



1 




9 


1 



5 





11 


1 


4 
3 




7 
3 




40 
6 
3 




Lost , - 


1 








. Quiescent 
318 


Living and working 

Living and not working 

Dead... 


6 



11 

1 


16 
1 

19 



29 
4 

31 



41 
9 

16 
2 


30 
8 

11 
1 


40 

23 

4 

1 


6 

8 




168 
53 
92 




Lost ---.-. 


5 








Improved 
202 


Living and working 

Living and not working 

Dead... . 


5 

2 

17 




6 

2 

18 




10 

1 

19 




16 
7 

22 
1 


17 
5 

19 



13 

6 
4 



2 
9 

1 


69 
32 
99 




Lost ... 


2 








Unimproved 
42 


Living and working 

Living and not working 

Dead 





1 






4 



2 

4 





6 




2 
8 




1 
7 





7 




2 
10 
30 




Lost 





Total 
632 


Living and working 

Living and not working 

Dead 


14 
2 

30 

1 


27 
3 

42 



57 
5 

55 



63 

18 

44 

3 


59 

15 

38 

2 


58 

33 

15 

1 


16 

30 



1 


294 
106 
224 




Lost... 


8 









26 



Annual Keport, 1920 



PRESENT CONDITION OF ALL FAR ADVANCED PATIENTS DISCHARGED 
FROM THE SANATORIUM PREVIOUS TO JUNE 30. 1920 



Condition on 


Condition November 30, 1920 






Years Discharged 






Discharge 


1914 


1915 


1916 


1917 


1918 


1919 


1920 


Total 


Arrested 



Living and working 

Living and not working 

Dead . .... 



















































Lost 











Apparently 

Arrested 

1 


Living and working ._. 

Living and not working 

Dead 
































1 












1 







Lost - 











Quiescent 
86 


Living and working 

Living and not working 

Dead 



1 
2 



4 

2 

10 




3 


8 



8 
3 
9 



8 
5 
5 



8 
3 

2 

1 


1 
2 
1 



32 
16 
37 




Lost 


1 








Improved 
152 


Living and working __ 

Living and not working 

Dead 






19 




2 
2 

21 



2 

2 

16 

1 


5 



30 




8 

5 

11 





10 
10 

1 




7 




17 

26 

107 




Lost . - . . . 


2 








Unimproved 
133 


Living and working 

Living and not working 

Dead 






19 






1 

13 








13 




1 



17 




1 

1 

29 






2 

25 

1 




7 
3 



2 

11 

119 




Lost 


1 








Total 
372 


Living and working „ _. 

Living and not working 

Dead 




1 

40 




6 

5 

44 




5 

2 
37 

1 


14 
3 

56 



17 

11 

45 




9 
15 
37 

3 


1 

16 
4 



52 

53 

263 




Lost .... .... 


4 









OUTSIDE PATIENTS EXAMINED FOR DIAGNOSIS AND CONSULTATION 



December 41 

January 51 

February ..113 

March 50 

Total 




August 75 

September ..89 

October 66 

November 53 

826 



ORGANIZATIONS SUPPORTING PATIENTS AT NORTH 

CAROLINA SANATORIUM, WITH NUMBER 

SO SUPPORTED 

American Red Cross, Greenville, N. C 1 

American Red Cross, Greensboro, N. C 1 

American Red Cross, Henderson, N. C 1 

American Red Cross, Fayetteville, N. C 3 

American Red Cross, Raleigh, N. C 1 

American Red Cross, Lenoir, N. C 1 

Caswell Training School, Kinston, N. C 1 

Baptist Philathea Class, Henderson, N. C 1 

Board of County Commissioners, Pasquotank County 2 

Board of County Commissioners, Surry County 1 

District Nurse and Relief Commission, Greensboro, N. C 1 

First Baptist Church, Elizabeth City, N. C 1 

Scotland Neck Mills, Scotland Neck, N. C '. . . 1 

Thompson Orphanage, Charlotte, N. C 1 

City of Elkin 1 

Board of Charity and Relief, Charlotte, N. C 1 

Board of Charity and Relief, Goldsboro, N. C 1 

Baptist Baraca Class, Oxford, N. C 1 



27 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT, 1920 



ASSETS AND LIABILITIES 

Assets 
Fixed Properties: 

Real estate (Hospital grounds) $ 20,000.00 

Administration building 6,100.00 

Superintendent's residence 7,150.00 

Nurses' home 10,200.00 

Assembly hall, dining hall and kitchen 8,500.00 

Infirmary 184,684.31 

One-story shack 3,700.00 

Two-story shack 6,731.84 

Snow Hill cottage 1,750.00 

Physician's residence 3,500.00 

Farm residence 3,705.64 

Real estate (farm) 34,750.00 

Dairy buildings and equipment 23,728.10 

Power, heat, water, lights, refrigeration, and 

plumbing 51,070.47 

Telephone system 3,290.37 

Sewer system and disposal plants 11,178.39 $380,039.12 

Inventories: 

Farm supplies 1,846.60 

Machinery and tools 2,810.90 

Live stock 1,875.00 

Dairy supplies 2,647.40 

Live stock 18,490.00 

Hogs 2.575.00 

ii'urniture and fixtures 17,208.29 

Linen and bedding 6,441.40 

•Crockery and silver 542.40 

Drugs and medicines 1,750.00 

Hospital supplies and equipment 14.677.05 

Provisions 7,145.45 

Training school books 198.16 

Power, heat, water, etc., supplies 2,182.20 

Telephone system (supplies) 150.00 

Stereopticon outfit 131.00 

Library 135.00 

Office supplies (business) 20000 

Office equipment (business) 408.00 

Office supplies (extension) 1,057.00 

Office equipment (extension) 3,473.00 

Laboratory and medical office equipment 4,439.05 

■Transportation and drayage equipment 3,650.00 94,032.90 

Cash in drawer 1,988.12 

Cash in banks 4,172.26 

Balance permanent improvement fund 23,073.42 29,233.80 



$503,305.82 



|[28! 



The !N'orth Carolina Sanatorium 29' 

Liabilities 

Reserve for depreciation $ 19,286.38 

Overdraft, extension fund 197.50 

Balance contract H. F. Hann & Co 8,837.47 

Extra work, H. F. Hann & Co.: 

Labor ceiling attic left wing 420.58 

Work on dairy barn 73.20 

Work on Snow-Hill cottage 50.79 

Balance L. F. Waldrop & Co. contract 3,108.34 

Balance Otis Elevator Company 2,725.00 

Balance General Fire Extinguisher Company 3,568.40 

State Architect's Cert. No. 10 unpaid 1,530.00 

State Architect's Cert. No. 14 unpaid 1,530.00 

State Architect's Cert. No. 15 unpaid 1,402.50 

State Architect's Cert. No. 16 unpaid 1,096.00 

State Red Cross Seal Commis.sion: 

Soldiers B. and T. advanced 3,187.00 

H. F. Hann & Co., removing awnings 17.60 

Current accounts payable: 

Surgical Selling Company 314.93 

S. H. Couch & Company 1,000-00 

Carlisle Commission Company 490.98 

Virginia Machinery and Well Company 771.09 

J. A. Arey 2.50 

City Telephone Company 10.60 

P. P. McCain, expenses to American Sanatoria! 

Assembly 91.35 

W. H. Arthur 5.00 

W. I. Van Ness Company 8.58 

Pound & Moore 9.00 

Remington Typewriter Company 1.00 

Mrs. F. C. Williams, traveling expenses 139.88 

Swift & Company 906.46 

Armour & Company 487.34 

George Marsh Company 751.95 

J. T. White Company, Inc 50.65 

Lexington Grocery Company 202.48 

Kingan & Company 100.65 

Kronenberg X-Ray and Supply Company 177.07 

J. M. Thompson Company 1,144.11 

J. E. Covington 33.35 

J. S. Maultsby 6.75 

Refund board and treatment: 

Albert Hollowell 42^00 

Grinnell Company 504.07 

Citizens Lumber Company 450.27 $ 54,732.84 

Net worth — Assets in excess of liabilities $448,572.98- 



so Annual Eepobt, 1920 

TRIAL BALANCE 

November 30, 1920. 

Dr. Cr. 

Surplus $477,661.56 

Real estate. Sanatorium grounds $ 20,000.00 

Administration building 6,100.00 

Nurses' home 10,200.00 

Superintendent's residence 7,150.00 

Assembly hall, dining hall and kitchen 8,-500.00 

Infirmary 184,684.31 

Open-air cottage No. 1 3,700.00 

Open-air cottage No. 2 6,731.84 

Snow-Hill cottage 1,750.00 

Physicians' residence ' 3,500.00 

Farm supplies and expense 1,846.60 

Real estate, farm 34,750.00 

Farm machinery and equipment 2, 810. 90 

Farm live stock 1,875.00 

Farm residence 3,705.64 

Dairy supplies and expense 2,647.40 

Barns, silos, bottling plant and equipment 23,728.10 

Dairy live stock 18,490.00 

Hog account 2,575.00 

Furniture and fixtures: 

Hospital 7,042.00 

Dining hall and kitchen 7,521.60 

Superintendent's residence 1,594.69 

Nurses' home 1,050.00 

Linen and bedding 6,441.40 

Crockery and silver 542.40 

Drugs and medicine 1,750.00 

Hospital supplies and equipment 14,677.05 

Provisions 7,145.45 

Training school books 198.16 

Power, heat, water, lights 53,252.67 

Telephone system 3,440.37 

Stereopticon outfit 131.00 

Library 135.00 

Ofl^ce supplies — business 200.00 

Office equipment — business 408.00 

Office supplies — extension 1,057.00 

Office equipment — extension 3,473.00 

Laboratory and medical office equipment 4,439.05 

Sewer system and disposal plant 11,178.39 

Transportation and drayage equipment 3,650.00 

Reserve for depreciation 19,286.38 

Permanent improvement fund 23,073.42 

Extension fund 197.50 



Totals $497,145.44 $497,145.44 



The N'orth Carolina Sanatorium 31 

PERMANENT IMPROVEMENT FUND 

Appropriation of General Assembly 1917 $150,000.00 

Appropriation of General Assembly 1919 $100,000.00 

$250,000.00 

Disbursements 
1917— 

Buildings, new $ 51-36 

Buildings, repairs 2,986.74 

Dining hall and kitchen 37.38 

Telephone system 77.08 

Heating system 92.82 

Power (boiler) 4,025.47 

Lights 62.42 

Waterworks 14,965.05 

Refrigeration 11.70 

Landscape 30.80 

Sewer system 4,903.88 $27,244.79 

1918— 

Buildings, new $ 2,585.10 

Buildings, repairs 295.99 

Furniture and fixtures, Nurses' home. . . 1,383.93 

Office equipment 5. 25 

Telephone system 1,438.21 

Heating system 11.03 

Waterworks 1,318.64 

Laundry 50.00 

Dairy (barns and silos) 7,291.59 

Sewer 29.00 14,408.74 

1919— 

Buildings, new $ 31,617.10 

Buildings, repairs 1,203.93 

Hospital fixtures 4.00 

Transportation and drayage 55.46 

Telephone system 25.79 

Power plant 18.58 

Sewers and disposal plant 12,100.97 

Laundry 1,006.75 

Dairy barns and silos 12,071.43 60,104.01 

1920— 

Buildings, new $ 119,755.63 

Buildings, repairs 631.84 

Furniture and fixtures, hospital 2,548.78 

Telephone system 914.84 

Refrigeration 1,682.52 125,533.61 

$227,291.06 227,291.06 

Balance unexpended $ 22,708.94 



32 Annual Report, 1920 

Balance appropriation unexpended Nov. 30, 1920 $ 22,708.84 

Refund from Tucker & Laxton acct. per. imp 364.48 

Total $ 23,073.43 

Contracts pending: 

Balance H. F. Hann & Company contract $ 8,837.49 

Balance L. F. Waldrop contract 3,108.34 

Balance Otis Elevator Company contract 2,725.00 

Balance General Fire Extinguisher Company 3,568.40 

State Architect's Cert. No. 10 unpaid 1,530.00 

State Architect's Cert. No. 14 unpaid 1,530.00 

State Architect's Cert. No. 15 unpaid 1,402.50 

State Architect's Cert. No. 16 unpaid 1,096.00 

H. F. Hann & Co., ceiling left wing attic 420. 58 

H. F. Hann & Co., work on dairy barn 73.20 

H. F. Hann & Co., work on Snow Hill cottage 50.79 

Grinnell Company 504.07 

Citizens Lumber Company 450.27 

S. H. Couch & Company 1,000.00 26,296.64 

Deficit $ 3,223.22 



MAINTENANCE FUND, 1920. 

Appropriation $ 50,000.00 

Additional allowance 5,000.00 $55,000.00 

Disbursements (see Disbursement Sheet) 55,000.00 

Maintenance — Patients' Fund: 

Bank of Hoke, overdraft December 1, 1919 $ 2,200.51 

Outstanding vouchers December 1, 1919 13.90 

Vouchers drawn Dec. 1, 1919, to Nov. 30, 1920 93,216.39 

Deposited checks unpaid by bank 71.04 ^95,501.84 

Deposits Dec. 1, 1919, to Nov. 30, 1920 $ 95,216.37 

Overdraft November 30, 1920 285.47 

Extension Fund: 

Appropriation $ 15,000.00 

Overdraft 197.50 $15,197.50 

Expenditures as per Disbursement Sheet 15,197.50 



The JSTortii Carolina Sanatorium 33 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

Fiscal Year Ending Novem'ber 30, 1920. 

Receipts 

state appkopriations 

State Sanatorium Total 
Fund Fun d 

Permanent improvement fund $130,000.00 

Extension fund 15,000.00 

Maintenance fund 50,000.00 

Extra allowance to cover deficit 5,000.00 

Total Appropriations $200,000.00 

SANATORIUM EARNINGS 

Board and treatment of patients $ 84,351.41 

X-Ray examinations 1,825.00 

Total earnings $ 86,176.41 

INTERTRADING ACCOUNTS 

Sale of automobile $ 600.00 

Laundry 1,502.79 

Hospital supplies 1,662.99 

Sale of hogs 130.00 

Telephone and telegraph messages 150-77 

Office rent 67.50 

Farm sales 91.11 

Dairy sales 60.00 

Sale of provisions and supplies 3,767.52 

Miscellaneous 129.00 

Total intertrading accounts 8,161.68 

Total Sanatorium receipts 94,338.09 

REFUND 

Refund — Deposited in Page Trust Company 364.48 

Total receipts $294,702.57 

Disbursements 

permanent improvements 

Buildings, new $119,755.63 

Buildings, improvements 631.84 

Hospital furniture and fixtures 2,548.78 

Telephone system 914.84 

Refrigeration 1,682.52 

Total $125,533.61 



34 Annual Eepoet, 1920 

extension 

state Sanatorium Total 

Fund Fund 

Executive salaries $ 8,334.89 

Traveling expenses 3,261.32 

Office furniture and fixtures 259.86 

Books and stationery 1,837.36 

Stamps 631.79 

Miscellaneous 872.28 15,197.50 

Total permanent improvements and extension $140,731.11 

MAINTENANCE APPROPRIATION DISBURSEMENTS 

Salaries, medical $ 1,46700 $ 2,904.80 

Executive 580.00 1,326.46 

Nurses and attendants 1,693.09 3,077.47 

Cooks and servants 4,291.67 5,861.9i) 

Miscellaneous 54.18 351.25 

Totals $ 8,085.94 $ 13,521.88 21,607.82 

SUPPLIES 

Bedding and linen $ 1,662.07 $ 1,436.49 

Crockery and silver 230.63 1,055.92 

Drugs and medicine 1,007. 05 1,419.33 

Miscellaneous 1,989.39 2,256.09 

Totals $ 4,798.14 $ 6,167.83 10,965.97 

PROVISIONS 

Meats $ 4,804.94 $7,361.50 

Butter 948.48 2,045.76 

Eggs 3,201.10 6,644.71 

Vegetables and fruits 1,156.46 2,123.54 

Groceries 5,874.39 12,236.25 

Miscellaneous 180.32 17.75 

Totals $ 16,165. 69 $ 30,429.51 46,595.20 

EQUIPMENT 

Furniture and fixtures $ 485.00 $ 237.14 

Instruments 1.75 326.51 

Miscellaneous 257.52 

Totals $ 744.27 $ 563.65 1,307.92 

OFFICE 

Stationery and books $ 23'5.57 $ 21.00 

Stamps 151.26 206.80 

Miscellaneous 1.66 1.00 

Equipment 24.67 

Totals $ 388.49 $ 253.47 641.96 



The ISToRTH Carolina Sanatorium 35 

POWER AND HEAT 

State Sanatorium Total 

Fund Fund 

Labor | 604.00 $ 1,338.02 

■ Supplies 3,419.66 9,233.55 

Miscellaneous 8.69 

Totals $ 4,032.35 $ 10,571.57 $ 14,603.92 

LIGHT 

Labor $ 177.00 $ 331.45 

Supplies 495.13 616.57 

Totals ,$ 672.13 $ 948-02 1,620.15 

WATER 

Labor $ 229.70 $ 572.88 

Equipment 590.89 301.05 

Fuel 1,132.36 401.00 

Supplies 234.55 379.00 

Miscellaneous 50.00 

Totals $ 2,237.50 $ 1,654.83 3,892.33 

REFRIGERATION 

Labor $ 115.00 $ 249.60 

Supplies 301.41 640.76 

Totals $ 416.41 $ 890-36 1,306.77 

PLUMBING AND SEWERS 

Labor $ 250.95 $ 265.00 

Supplies 42.18 29.82 

Totals $ 293.13 $ 294.82 587.95 

FARM 

Buildings $ 61.47 $ 54.81 

Live stock 1,004.50 25.25 

Machinery and tools 73.64 873.40 

Seed and fertilizer 244.77 3,642.35 

Feed 1,316.40 989.10 

Labor 1,268-00 5,374.33 

Miscellaneous 76.73 120.53 

Repairs 14.29 

Totals $ 4,045.51 $ 11,125.06 15,170.57 

DAIRY 

Buildings and silos $ $ 97.90 

Repairs 6.00 36-27 

Live stock 157.85 575.46 

Fixtures 60.74 10-00 

Supplies 201.03 423.52 

Feed 1,554.26 4,799.35 

Labor 529.38 1,112.83 

Insurance 15.00 

Miscellaneous 16.62 15.00 

Totals $ 2,525.87 $ 7,085.33 9,611.20 



36 Annual Eeport, 1920 

MISCELLANEOUS 

State Sanatorium Total 

Fund Fund 

Labor $ 90.60 $ 20.23 

Training school 26.67 33.56 

Messages 240.17 40020 

Laundry 1,495.90 2,202.09 

Transportation and drayage 4,666.70 3,625.63 

Insurance 162.50 

Refunds 298.89 386.50 

Freight and express 814.99 1,251.93 

Hogs 2,035.50 914.26 

Landscape 35.65 

X-Ray 921.45 622.27 

Furniture and fixtures 3.70 55.25 

Totals $ 10,594.57 $ 9.710.06 $ 20,304.63 

Return checks charged at Bank of Hoke 71.04 



Total maintenance disbursements $ 55,000.00 $93,216.39 $148,287.43 



FIXED PROPERTIES 

November 30, 1920 

Real estate and hospital grounds $ 20,000.00 

Administration building 6,100.00 

Superintendent's residence 7,150.00 

Nurses' home 10,200.00 

Assembly hall, dining hall and kitchen 8,500.00 

Infirmary 184,684.31 

Open-air cottage No. 1 3,700.00 

Open-air cottage No. 2 6,731.84 

Snow Hill cottage 1,750.00 

Physician's Residence 3,500.00 

Farm 38,455.64 

Dairy buildings 23,72610 

Power, heat, water and lights 51,070.47 

Telephone system 3,290.37 

Sewer system and disposal plant 11,178.39 

Total $380,039.12 

INVENTORIES 

November 30, 1920 

Farm supplies $ 1,846.60 

Machinery and equipment 2,810.90 

Live stock 1,875.00 

Total farm $ 6,532.50 

Dairy supplies $ 2,647.40 

Live stock 18,490.00 

Total dairy $ 21,137.40 



The North Carolina Sanatorium 37 

INVENTORIES— Con^inwefZ 

Hogs $ 2,575.00 

Furniture and fixtures 17,208.29 

Linen and bedding 6,441.40 

Crockery and silver 542.40 

Drugs and medicine 1,750.00 

Hospital supplies and equipment 14,677.05 

Provisions 7,145.45 

Training school books 198 16 

Power, heat, v^^ater and lights 2,182.20 

Telephones 150.00 

Stereopticon outfit • 131.00 

Library 135.00 

OflSce supplies — business 200.00 

Office equipment — business 408.00 

Office supplies — extension 1,057.00 

Office equipment — extension 3,473.00 

Laboratory and medical office equipment 4,439.05 

Transportation and drayage equipment 3,650.00 

Total $ 94,032.90 



ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 
November 30, 1920 

State Red Cross Seal Commission (board and treatment soldiers 

advanced) $ 3,187.00 

State Architect's certificates unpaid: 

Certificate No. 10 . '. $ 1,530.00 

Certificate No. 14 1,530.00 

Certificate No. 15 1,402.50 

Certificate No. 16 545.00 

Certificate No. 17 551.00 

Total 5,558.50 

Surgical Selling Company, Atlanta 314.93 

S. H. Couch Company, telephone 1,000.00 

Carlisle Commission Company, feed 490.98 

Virginia Machinery and Well Company, pumping outfit 771.09 

J. A. Arey, West Raleigh 2.50 

City Telephone Company, Southern Pines 10. 60 

P. P. McCain, exp. Amer. Sanatorial Assembly 91.35 

W. H. McArthur, Aberdeen 5.00 

W. I. VanNess Company, Charlotte 8.58 

Pound & Moore Company, Charlotte '. 9.00 

Remington Typewriter Company, Raleigh 1.00 

Mrs. P. C. Williams, traveling exenses 139.88 

Swift & Company, Raleigh 906.46 

Armour & Company, Greensboro 487-34 

George Marsh Company, Raleigh 751.95 

J. T. White Company, Inc., Norfolk 50.65 



38 Annual Repokt^ 1920 

ACCOUNTS PAY ABL,B— Continued 

Lexington Grocery Company, Troy, N. C ? 202.48 

Kinghan & Company, Norfolk 100.65 

Kronenberg X-Ray and Supply Company, Baltimore 177.07 

J. M. Thompson Company, Philadelphia 1,144.11 

J. E. Covington, Tiniberland, N. C 33.35 

J. S. Maultsby, Timberland, N. C 6.75 

Refund board and treatment — Alberta Hollowell 42.00 

H. F. Hann & Company, awnings removed 17.60 

H. F. Hann & Company, repairs Snow-Hill Cottage 50.70 

H. F. Hann, & Company, work on dairy barn 73.20 

H*. F. Hann & Company, balance contract 8,837.49 

H. F. Hann & Company, ceiling left wing Infirmary 420.58 

L. F. Waldrop & Company, balance on contract 3,108.34 

Otis Elevator Company, balance on contract 2,725.00 

General Fire Extinguisher Company, balance on contract 3,568.40 

Citizens Lumber Company 450.27 

Grinnell Company 504.07 

Total $ 35,248.96 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

NORTH CAROLINA TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION 

1920 



[39] 



OFFICERS AND BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Mrs. Gordon Finger, President, Charlotte, N. C. 

Mrs. Charles R. Whitake^r, Vice-President, Hendersonville, N. C. 

Dr. L. B. McBrayek, Executive Secretary, Sanatorium, N. C. 

Dr. Otho B. Ross, Charlotte, N. C. 

Mrs. Cuthbert Maetin, Wilmington, N. C. 

Mrs. T. D. Jones, Durham, N. C. 

Mrs. C. C. Hook, Charlotte, N. C. 

Dr. W. L. Dunn, Asheville, N. C. 

Col,. J. L. Lltdlow, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Mrs. Mark Quinneely, Greenville, N. C. 

Mrs. S. H. Brown, Oxford, N. C. 

Mrs. J. L. Wetmore, Arden, N. C. 

Mr. Hamilton C. Jones, Charlotte, N. C. 

Mrs. R. C. Warren, Gastonia, N. C. 

Mrs W. N. Hutt, Candor, N. C. 

Dr. Chas. L. Minor, Asheville, N. C. 

A. W. Snow, Assistant Secretary 



(«] 



ANNUAL REPORT 
NORTH CAROLINA TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION 

1920 

We desire to direct attention to the Annual Report of the ISTorth 
Carolina Tuberculosis Association. This is a volunteer association, 
and is financed wholly by the annual sale of Tuberculosis Christmas 
Seals. A^^iile it has no connection whatever in fact with the Division 
of Tuberculosis of the State Board of Health, yet its aims and purposes 
are largely the same, and the absence of overlapping and the close 
cooperation with tuberculosis work of every kind in the State make 
it a most valuable asset in the fight against tuberculosis in l^orth 
Carolina. In fact, but for the cooperation of this Association the 
appropriation to the Division of Tuberculosis would have been totally 
and wholly inadequate in keeping pace with the advance of tuber- 
culosis work in our State. 

We are in position today to use to great advantage 100% more 
money than is in hand from both the State appropriation and the 
State Tuberculosis Association. 

Let us mention one or two items of work done by the State Tuber- 
culosis Association : The Tuberculosis Clinic conducted by Dr. J. L. 
Spruill has examined 1,419 people, of whom 25% were positive for 
tuberculosis. It has aroused the interest of the people in tuberculosis 
to such an extent that we expect to have more than one county 
Tuberculosis Hospital in the near future. 

The Moving Picture Car for negroes has carried the moving picture 
theatre to the negroes in rural districts, spending one week in each of 
fifty counties, and 42,861 people have seen the pictures. Films on 
Health, Civics, Agriculture, and other subjects of value have been 
presented, and usually there is shown each evening a comic picture, 
bringing out rollicking fun. 

We desire to direct your earnest attention to the detailed report 
herewith. 

In submitting report of the 1920 seal sale your Executive Secretary 
advises that the following local chairmen have not made report of 
sale, and the amounts due from these towns are, therefore, not included 
in this report; Mrs. P. W. Vaughn, Durham; Mr. E. F. Redding, 
Lucama; Dr. E. G. McMillan, Maxton; Mr. T. F. Limrick, Monroe; 
Mr. Alex H. White, Polloksville ; Mrs. W. W. Williams, Rocky Mount ; 

[41] 



42 Annual Report, 1920 

Mr. L. A. McGeachey, St. Pauls; Dr. B. H. Palmer, Shelby; Mr. G. G. 
JSTicliols, Sparta; Miss Elizabeth Garden, Spray; Mrs. J. W. Manning, 
Williamston. 

According to the sale of seals last year we are due to receive a 
total of $2,143.84 from these eleven towais, of which amount $535.96 
will be due the Executive office. A report of this amount is made 
under schedule "q" and will be referred to later. 

It will be noted that the amount raised in the seal sale of 1919 
exceeded this year's sale by approximately $3,500.00, but it must be 
borne in mind that the financial condition of the country w^as vastly 
different in 1919 to what obtained in 1920. The outlook for an 
increase in the sale was bright until ISTovember, at w^hich time the 
cotton mills and other industries began closing down, thereby creating 
a depression in the emplojTiient of labor, with its accompanying 
shortage of money. 

These conditions did not obtain in Greensboro, "Winston-Salem, 
Charlotte, Wilmington, Asheville, or towns of like size, but it will be 
remembered that ISTorth Carolina has numerous towns with a population 
ranging from 1,500 to 7,000, a large number of which are "cotton mill 
towns." It was therefore in these smaller towns that the financial 
depression was felt worst and was reflected in a much smaller sale 
of seals than in previous years. 

It will also be remembered that the purchasing power of the dollar 
was depreciated in 1919 to about 50% of its normal power. This 
condition is improving, and we believe as much or more work can be 
accomplished this year with the receipts realized as was done last year. 

Much credit is due the chairmen and committees in the larger towns 
above mentioned for the success of the sale this year. The harmonious 
organization in these towns was wonderful; add to this the interest 
of these workers in the health of their citizens and the determination 
to raise sufficient funds that the tuberculosis work may not suffer, and 
we begin to understand to some extent the success which attended their 
efforts, all the larger towns mentioned showing increased sales over 1919. 

The colored seal sale chairmen working in 42 counties exceeded the 
amount raised last year by a few hundred dollars. 

We had intimated that $8,500 would be required to operate two 
traveling moving picture outfits this year, and prepared budgets for 
the chairmen on this basis. You will notice the net receipts were 
$3,000 less. But again when we realize that the amount raised by the 
colored people of 42 counties, most of which was raised in the rural 
sections, exceeds by 6c the total seal sale in North Carolina for 1913, 
we feel like saying, "Well done, thou good and faithful servant." 



North Carolina Tuberculosis Association 43" 

The mail sale was not used as extensively this year as last. There 
was a total of 12,500 mail sale letters containing 100 seals and 1,200 
letters containing 500 seals sent. It will be noticed that the cash 
returns received from this number was approximately 33%, calculated 
on the basis of $1.00 per letter, which is the same in proportion as 
the cash return of last year. 

Before taking up the analysis of receipts and expenditures for the 
fiscal year it would be well to consider the policies and plans of the 
National Association for the coming year. 

At the conference of Tuberculosis Executives at Chicago, January 
5-6-7, it was voted that the official date for the seal sale be from 
November 25th to December 25th. (Thanksgiving to Christmas.) 

It was voted that the sale of Health Bonds be continued, but that 
they be smaller in size. The seal design is to include Santa Claus, 
the child and the double-barred cross. 

It was decided that State Associations purchase supplies from the 
National Association on the same general plan as last year, providing 
for payment on July 1st, August 1st, and September 1st. 

It was the sentiment of the Secretaries present that the percentage 
of the seal sale proceeds to be paid to the National Association shall 
remain at 5% of the gross receipts. 

Dr. Hatfield stated that one Director of the National Association 
is to be named by each affiliated and represented association, and that 
the selection of this director be made at the annual meeting of such 
association. 

In defining the meaning of "affiliated and represented associations" 
the National Association states that they must maintain the following 
qualifications : 

1. They shall not be under the direction or control of any state or 
local governmental agency. 

2. Such association must have: 

(a) A membership which has representation and participation 
in its afl^airs. 

(b) A president and other officers, an executive committee, a 
salaried executive or similar officer, and a board of directors 
representative of the territory covered by the association. 

(c) The membership must meet at least once a year; the board 
of directors or executive committee must meet at least four 
times a year. 

(d) The association must operate under a constitution and by- 
laws, with an annual program and budget. 

(e) The accounts must be audited by a certified public account- 
ant or his equivalent at least once a year and a copy filed 
with the National Association. 



44 Annual Report, 1920 

(f) An annual report of accomplishments, receipts and expend- 
itures shall be prepared and made available to officers, 
members and the public and given all possible publicity. 

(g) All associations shall comply with and carry out the aims 
and objects of the N^ational Association, submitting such 
reports as may be required by the Association, and must 
accept the responsibility of working out and sharing with 
the ISTational Association means of financing their mutual 
activities. 

It is further proposed that the Executive Committee of the ISTatioTial 
Association shall be the sole judge of the foregoing qualifications 
for affiliated and represented associations, and of their right to mem- 
bership and representation on the Board of Directors of the JSTational 
Association. 

At present the affiliated and rej^resented associations consist of the 
State Tuberculosis Associations and five local city associations. Thus 
it will be seen that the State Associations will have reprpsen^ation o-'^ 
the Board of Directors of the National Association to the extent of 
53 members. These directors may not be elected for a period of more 
than two years and are not eligible unless they are directors of the 
State or local organization. 

Your Executive Secretary recommends that the qualifications men- 
tioned be submitted to the chairmen of our local organizations in 
order that they may organize associations to conform to these require- 
ments if they so desire. 

On December 28, 1920, the National Association advised your Execu- 
tive Secretary that they had registered the double-barred cross as 
the trade-mark of the National Tuberculosis Association and that its 
use would not be permitted by "affiliated and representative associa- 
tions," unless all matter bearing the trade-mark was first submitted to 
the National Association for approval. In this connection it will be 
remembered that the "North Carolina Anti-Tuberculosis Association," 
which is the parent of our present association, was organized in 1904 
and has at all times used and endeavored to popularize the use of 
the double-barred cross ; and that the National Association was not 
organized until the same year, and therefore has no priority of right 
in the use of the double-barred cross. Your Executive Secretary further 
submits that it is not feasible to submit material to the National 
Association before publication ; that to do so will occasion delays in 
our work that will be exceedingly harmful; that it will defeat the 
purpose of having an emblem to distinguish tuberculosis work in that 
its use will be so restricted that it will appear on pamphlets and 
publications only at rare intervals. Your Executive Secretary believes 
that the use of the double-barred cross should be so restricted as to pre- 



North Carolina Tuberculosis Association 45 

vent its use by unauthorized persons or organizations, but believes that 
the state and local organizations should be given full authority for its 
use oil all matters approved by said Association. This matter is under 
consideration by the JSTational Association Directors at this time. 

The Executive OiRce is confident that through the use of the double- 
barred cross and the publicity given the work of the North Carolina 
Tuberculosis Association during the past year that the Association has 
gained wonderfully in prestige and that its work is better known and 
approved in the State today than ever before. A great deal of credit 
for this is due the local associations that during the past year placed 
their work before the public by means of the press and publications. 
The favorable opinion created and the popularization of the cross will be 
much curtailed if the policy of the National Association in this respect 
is pursued. In this connection it is proper to say that the publicity 
given the tuberculosis work in general and the seal sale in particular 
by the newspapers of "Winston-Salem is worthy of special mention, 
as is the work of Dr. R. L. Carlton, who made it possible. 

By referring to the analysis of expenditures under schedule (a) it 
will be seen that the campaign expenses for the year totaled $5,937.62, 
for which an appropriation of $3,000.00 was made. Included in this 
amount, however, is $1,319.60 paid the National Association for seal 
supplies. Formerly, these supplies were furnished free, the State 
Association, however, was required to pay 10.7% of the gross receipts 
to the National Association, which amount was reduced to 5% and the 
local associations required to pay for all supplies ordered. The State 
Association shows a saving of $500.00 by this arrangement. 

The cost of postage stamps was also a large item in these expenses, 
a total of $900.00 being required. Of course a large proportion of this 
was used on the mail sale letters, it being required that we enclose 
a stamped, self-addressed envelope for return of remittance, with all 
seals sent out. 

The subscription blanks as recommended for last year were secured 
at a cost of $171.00, and were, we believe, productive of good results 
in increasing the sale of seals and bonds. 

The salaries for the entire office force used during the three months 
of the campaign are included under this heading and aggregate a 
total of $1,842.09 for the 8 employees used. 

Under schedule (b) a part of the appropriation was used for the 
purchase of a dairy wagon. This appropriation is a balance carried 
over from 1919, as it was thought wise to let it continue until the 
dairy plant was completed. ■ We are pleased to report that the dairy 
bottling plant is now modern in every respect and that the Sanatorium 
appreciates greatly the assistance given by the Association in this 
respect. 



46 Annual Report, 1920 

(c) You will notice a total of $5,558.50 lias been expended under 
tlie loan appropriation to build a workshop to be used for occupational 
therapy and a garage building. Without this loan it would not 
have been possible for the Sanatorium to have erected this building 
until the latter part of this year or possibly next year. "We will 
then have had the use of the building two years earlier than would 
have been the case without this loan. The Sanatorium expects to 
repay this loan during the present year and cognizance is taken of 
this in figuring the assets of the Association for the year. 

The building has made possible a wide range of vocational .work 
that is important in keeping the ambulatory patients contented and 
has also enabled the patients to make salable articles and thus contribute 
toward expense of treatment. The shop is equipped by the Federal 
Board for Vocational Education with a great many modern appli- 
ances that enable the patients to manufacture articles that would 
othei'^^'ise be impossible for them to do. The shop is used by discharged 
soldiers and civilian patients alike. 

(d) The appropriation for a consultant clinic physician has been 
a distinct addition to our work this year. The work was begun on 
May 1, 1920, with Dr. J. L. Spruill as clinic physician, and is steadily 
growing in popularity. We have been forced to make engagements 
several months in advance in order to take care of the numerous 
requests for this service. At this time engagements have been made 
up until' July. During the ten months the clinic has been in operation 
a total of 1,419 examinations for tuberculosis have been made. Ad- 
dresses on the nature, care and prevention of tuberculosis have been 
made by Dr. Spruill at 43 places to a total audience of 8,446. This 
work has been instrumental in interesting towns and counties in the 
tuberculosis problem to the extent of securing a pavilion addition for 
the treatment of tuberculosis to a general hospital ; for the ordering 
of an election to vote bonds for the purpose of erecting a county 
sanatorium; for interesting lo'cal units in providing public health 
nurses, and for interesting corporations in providing better care for 
emjDloyees. 

(e) A loan of $200.00 was made under this appropriation to Miss 
Alice B, Casey to complete the course in public health nursing. 
Immediately upon cona]3leting this course Miss Casey accepted the 
position as County Public Health Nurse of Robeson County. Owing 
to the shortage of Red Cross funds in this county Miss Casey has 
since been transferred to Davidson County. This amount makes a 
total of $300.00 loaned Miss Casey and is payable to the Association, 
without interest, during the two-year period following completion of 
the course. This account is carried in the assets under schedule (q). 



]^ORTH Carolina Tuberculosis Association 47 

(f) No expenditures were made under tlie appropriation to pay 
for board and treatment for discharged soldiers, as the Government 
is now paying these bills promptly. 

(g) $225.00 was used under the colored public health nursing 
appropriation to pay the salary of Blanche Hayes, a colored registered 
nurse attached to the Health Department of Edgecombe County, 
immediately under the direction and instruction of Miss Clara Ross, 
Public Health ISTurse for Edgecombe County, for a period of three 
months. This enabled the Health Department to provide visiting 
uursing service for the colored patients during the influenza epidemic 
of last year. Financing this work was of a temporary nature and was 
done to demonstrate the usefulness of colored public health nursing 
and aid the county until funds could be secured to continue the work. 
Blanche Hayes is now on the staff of the Charlotte Health Department. 

(h) The appropriation for additional X-ray equipment has not been 
used. At the last annual meeting it was recommended that this appro- 
priation be continued, as the Sanatorium would need some additional 
X-ray equipment as soon as the new infirmary and office building were 
completed. We had expected the building to be finished before the 
expiration of the fiscal year, but such was not the case, and we ask that 
this appropriation be continued for another year. 

(i) JSTot used. 

(j) The appropriation for the moving picture car to be used among 
colored people was sufficient to purchase and equip the car and make 
the circuit of all counties participating in the sale of tuberculosis 
seals. This schedule was completed in December and upon examination 
of the truck used we found that it would not be possible to use the 
same truck without extensive overhauling. As it was not desired to 
interrupt this service, that was proving* of such help in educating the 
colored people in regard to tuberculosis, it was decided, upon the 
sanction of the President, to purchase an entire new equipment and 
operate both cars during the coming year. 

The new car is now in operation and repairs on the old car have 
been completed with the exception of repainting, which can be done 
in a few days. We have been unsuccessful in securing a properly 
qualified man to operate this car. We have not, however, pushed the 
matter, as it is estimated that it will require at least $8,500.00 to keep 
both of the cars in operation for the entire year, and your Secretary 
concluded this was a larger amount than you would deem advisable 
to spend in this branch of the work during 1921. Since the car was 
put in operation on March 15, 1920, it has visited 50 counties, staying 
one week in each county, and has shown and explained health educa- 
tional pictures to a total audience of 42,861. In addition to exhibiting 
the pictures. Dr. Ransom, the operator, has visited over 1,500 families 



48 Annual Eeport, 1920 

in their homes, teaching the principles of good health and aiding the 
miembers in many other ways. 

(k) The appropriation of $2,000.00 for health work among the 
negroes was insufficient to carry out the program for the year and 
fulfill our contract for the year with other agencies cooperating. This 
appropriation was used to pay one month's salary for 41 colored super- 
vising teachers. By cooiJerating with the State Agent of Eural 
Colored Schools Ave were enabled to secure approximately one-sixth of 
the working time of these supervisors. "We have made use of this time 
by having the supervisors instruct the colored people of their county 
along general health lines with especial reference to tuberculosis. 
During the year these supervisors have reached 311,005 by word of 
mouth; distributed health educational literature to many thousands 
more; given illustrated lantern slide lectures to 15,000; raised $5,253.13 
in the seal sale and established the Modern Health Crusade in a 
number of colored schools in each county, enrolling a total of 16,500' 
crusaders since September, 1920. You will be interested to knoAV that 
the deaths from tuberculosis amoug the negroes have declined 21.4% 
in the last two years, according to reports of deaths sent the Bureau 
of Tuberculosis. There are 1,791 deaths recorded in 1918 against 
1,407 in 1920. 

(1) Self-explanatory, 

(m) The major portion of the appropriation for moving picture 
films was not used, as plans for photographing the pictures desired 
have not been comj)leted. We did, however, purchase three 1,000-feet 
films from the N^ational Association and have made use of these films 
on the moving picture car and as a loan to any party that could 
secure an exhibition of the films in either theater or school. The films 
have been exhibited in the latter manner 14 times to an audience 
of 1,700. 

It is hoped the Association will continue this appropriation to be 
used in the manner hereinafter explained. 

(n) The Modern Health Crusade has been enthusiastically received 
this year. A total of 40,224 crusaders have been enrolled since Sep- 
tember, 1920. It will be noticed that $989.65 of this appropriation 
has been used. Of this amount $465.64 has been recovered by the 
sale of supplies, and there is due the Association at this time $259.45, 
which makes a cost of $264.56 to the Association for conducting the 
Ci-usade. This difference in receipts and expenditures is accounted 
for by the Association furnishing supplies to the colored schools at 
one-half cost. This was necessary, as it was found that the colored 
schools could not raise the funds to pay the entire cost of ciiisade 
supplies without financial assistance. There are also a large number 
of sample copies of supplies sent out without chai'ge. An item for 
mailing supplies to the amount of $40.00 is also included in expenditures. 



North Carolina Tuberculosis Association 49 

We are hoping to simplify the Crusade somewhat this year in order 
to overcome the objection of some school authorities and thus obtain 
more universal adoption. The Crusade is filling an important place 
in teaching health rules to the school children by performance, and we 
strongly recommend its continuance. 

(o) Self-explanatory. 

(p) The miscellaneous expenditures under this schedule are all 
self-explanatory. We have endeavored to keep the miscellaneous expend- 
itures within the appropriation allowed, but find the amount was 
inadequate, as we were forced to pay bills from this account not 
especially appropriated for. 

(q) From this schedule it will be seen that the possible assets for 
this coming year total the net amount of $22,384.79, of which amount 
$14,380.27 is on deposit at the Merchants and Farmers Bank at 
Aberdeen, N. C, as sho'wn by certificate from bank attached hereto. 
It will be noted that the certificate from the bank shows a balance of 
$14,452.02. The difference is accounted for in the financial statement 
in outstanding checks. 

A total of $8,745.50 is due the Association by the Sanatorium 
account of loans to cover bills for board and treatment of discharged 
tuberculous soldiers and for the erection of the building for occupa- 
tional therapy. It is expected that this amount will be paid during 
the year. 

We are attaching hereto a budget carrying recommendation for 
expenditures somewhat in excess of the total of our net assets, and ask 
that this budget be adopted and the Executive Committee authorized 
to carry out the recommendation in so far as is possible with the 
funds available. 

BUDGET OF NORTH CAROLINA TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION 

For the fiscal year ending February 28, 1922 

Publicity Director .* $ 1,800.00 

Publication of Bulletin 3,000.00 

Campaign expenses (seal sale) 5,000.00 

Clinic Physician, salary $3,500, expenses $1,500 5,000.00 

Clinic Physician, for examination of school children 5,000.00 

Scholarship public health nurse 500.00 

Additional X-ray equipment 650.00 

Negro moving picture service 5,000.00 

Negro health work 3,000.00 

Expense executive committee meeting 500.00 

Movie films 1,000.00 

Research work at Sanatorium 2,000.00 

Modern Health Crusade 1,000.00 

Miscellaneous expense 3,000.00 



Total $ 36,450.00 



50 Annual Report^ 1920 

The National Association advise tliat they will not send any regular 
press material to the local papers this year, and recommend that each 
state employ a Director of Publicity. We heartily concur in this 
recommendation and call attention to the fact that the Publicity 
Director would be used not only to secure publicity for the seal sale, 
but would be expected to issue a monthly or bi-monthly bulletin of 
an educational character. The Publicity Director would also be 
expected to assist in the preparation of special bulletins and be available 
for consultation service to local associations. It is recommended that 
the tuberculosis diagnostic clinic be continued and that in addition 
the Executive Committee be empowered to employ an additional clinic 
physician for the examination of school children during the school 
term and to be used at local clinics when the school term is over. 

It is desired to prepare a moving picture film of local interest in 
which we can bring before the j)eople of North Carolina health 
educational matter in an interesting manner. We have recaived bids 
for preparing a film along the lines desired at a cost of 4.5c per foot. 
The expense of the photographer to' be in addition. 

For some time we have felt the need that more research work 
looking to the care and prevention of tuberculosis should be done. We 
realize that the Sanatorium presents an unequaled opportunity for 
making studies that should not be neglected. There is much research 
work in tuberculosis that can be done in no other place, and we are 
anxious that the North Carolina Tuberculosis Association shall be 
among the first of the associations to adopt a progressive policy 
along this line. 

That there is a need for such work is plainly evident when we 
make a survey of the tuberculosis situation in North Carolina. The 
population of the State, based on the 1920 census, is given at 2,556,486. 
Based on the most reliable estimates and from information on file 
there are known to be 25,000 of this number who are ill with tuber- 
culosis and in need of treatment. This does not take into considera- 
tion the large number of inactive, cured, and cases not sufficiently 
advanced to be generally diagnosed. Prom statistics received to date 
2,763 deaths were recorded. This number, we are glad to say, is a 
considerable reduction over previous years, the highest recorded num- 
ber of deaths having occurred in 1913, at which time 4,800 were 
reported as due to tuberculosis. It will be remembered, also, that this 
reduction was made during the time an increase in population of 
350,000 was made. If we can make these large gains in the fight 
against tuberculosis almost exclusively by educational methods, how 
much more we can hope to accomplish when the veil that shrouds the 
method to be used in the cure and prevention of tuberculosis is fully 



North Carolina Tuberculosis Association 51 

removed. Our part is to do what we can to bring the light of knowledge 
on some of these dark points, and to this end we respectfully recommend 
the appropriation of $2,000.00 for this purpose. 

The other appropriations recommended are for continuing work 
already under way of which the Directors are familiar. 

Your Executive Secretary believes the membership of the Board of 
Directors should be increased in order that fuller representation may 
be secured. The Directorate at this time is represented by the following 
cities : Charlotte, Hendersonville, Wilmington, Candor, Durham, Ashe- 
ville, Winston-Salem, Greenville, Oxford, Arden, and Gastonia. There 
should be a Director elected from Greensboro, one from Goldsboro, and 
one additional from Winston-Salem and such other towns as deemed 
advisable. It is further recommended that the local associations pay 
expenses of their Director to the State Association. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

L. B. McBrayer, 

Executive Secretary. 



REPORT OF AUDIT 



Kaleigh, N". C, March 31st, 1921. 

North Carolina Tuberculosis Association, 

Sanatorium, N. C. 

Gentlemen : — 

In accordance witli your instruction I have audited the books and 
accounts of Dr. L. B. McBrayer, Secretary, and respectfully submit 
the follov/ing report as a result of said audit. 

I find the books accurately and systematically kept and I had no 
difficulty in securing the information desired. 

I desire to extend congratulations on the great showing that you 
have made. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. J. Beknaed, 
Certified Public Accountant, 



[53] 



NORTH CAROLINA TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION 

REPORT 1920 SEAL SALE 

Total value seals sold $ 35,338.38 

Total value bonds sold 1,390.00 



Total value all paper sold $ 36,728.38 

Sold by local chairmen $ 27,337.97 

Sold by colored chairmen 5,253.13 

Sold by mail sale 4,137.28 



Value seals sold 

Kept by local chairmen. 



Receipts local chairmen $ 8,672.40 

Receipts colored chairmen 5,253.13 

Receipts mail sale 4,137.28 



Receipts Executive office 

Expenses: 

Seal supplies, stationery, literature $ 

Salaries, wages 

Postage and express 

All other expense 



3,046.17 

1,916.09 

900.00 

75.36 



36,728.38 
18,665.57 

18,062.81 
18,062.81 



18,062.81 



5% due National Association. 



5,937.62 

1,836.42 Exp. 7.774.04 



Net receipts Executive office $ 10,288.77 



Receipts 1913 $ 5,253.07 

1914 6,745.22 

1915 8,033.86 

1916 12,07874 

1917 17,541.02 

1919 42,407.18 

1920 36,728.38 



Receipts Ex. Office $1,613.22 Ex. $ 696.84 

2,160.05 " 1,235.72 

2,636.01 " 1.590.43 

4,786.33 " 2,750.56 

8,036.43 " 3,311.87 

23,408.53 " 8.528.18 

18,062.81 " 7,774.04 



FOANCIAL STATEMEJfT FOR THE FISCAL TEAR ENDING 

FEBRUARY 28, 1921 

Rl'XEIPTS 

Balance on hand from 1920 as per report submitted at Annual 

Meeting of State Red Cross Seal Commi'ssion Feb. 28, 1920. . . .$ 6,949.60 

From sale of Crusade supplies 465.64 

Receipts colored chairmen 5,253.13 

Receipts white chairmen 8.6"2.40 

Receipts mail sale ... 4,137.28 

Donations 176 00 

Transferred from savings to checking account 18,607.95 

Interest on above 837.32 

Total receipts $ 45,099.32 

1551 



56 Annual Repoet, 1920 

Total receipts $ 45,099.32 

Disbursements 

Campaign expenses $ 5,937.62 

Dairy equipment 273.35 

Loan, Bldg. Occupational Therapy 5,558.50 

Clinic Physician 2,964.18 

Scholarship Public Health Nurse 200.00 

Negro Public Health Nursing 225.00 

Negro moving picture car 8,070. 98 

Negro health work 3,104.92 

Expense directors' meeting 69.99 

Movie films . . ; 282.37 

Savings account 10,000.00 

Modern health crusade 989.65 

Miscellaneous 3,042.49 40,719.05 

Balance March 1, 1921 4,380.27 

Checks outstanding No. 631 13.00 

Checks outstanding No. 633 58.75 71.75 



Balance at the Merchants and Farmers Bank, Mar. 1, 1921. . $ 4,452.02 

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES AND RECEIPTS 
(a) 

Appropriation account of campaign expenses $ 3,000.00 

1920 
Feb. 9 National Asso., i/i cost seals and supplies $ 328.27 

Aug. 28 Commercial Printing Co., index cards. . . . 107.81 

National Asso., % cost seals and supplies 661.75 

Sept. 1 Stamps 25.00 

National Asso., 14 cost seals and supplies 329.58 

National Association cuts 3 '^7 

Sept. 3 Commerciol Ptg. Co., subscription blanks 171.00 

Sept. 15 L. Lindley, September salary 28.00 

Sept. 16 Stamps 50.00 

Sept. 17 L. Thorpe, September salary 100.00 

Pilgrim Spec. Company, bangles 187.75 

Sept. 28 R^ ■-'= 200.00 

Oct. 1 A. W. Snow, September salary 125.00 

Grady Ingle, September salary 70.00 

L. Bouldin, September salary 50.00 

L. Mayhew, September salary 45.00 

L. Redd, September salary 56.40 

0. B. Revell, September salary 25.00 

Oct. 4 Storr, Heath & Moore, stationery and env. 483.14 

Hackney, Moale & Co., stuffers 148.90 

Sibyl Brabble, September salary 5.32 

Oct. 7 Stamps 225.00 

Oct. 8 I. A. Taylor, wrapping paper 26.70 

N. Williams, school teacher's list 1.50 

Oct. 11 Atlas Educational Film Co., trailers.... 12.00 

Oct. 22 Stamps 50.00 

Nov. 1 A. W. Snow, October salary 125.00 

Grady Ingle, October salary 70.00 

L. Bouldin, October salary 50.00 

L. Mayhew, October salary 50.00 

S. Brabble, October salary 40.00 

L. Redd, October salary 32.62 

Mrs. J. L. Spruill, October salary 35.85 

Stamps 50.00 



North Carolina Tuberculosis Association 57 

Nov. 3 Hackney, Moale & Co., post cards $ 282.50 

Nov. 4 W. U. T. Co., October account 35.16 

Nov. 8 O. B. Revell, October salary 70.00 

Victor Animatograph Co., slides 112.10 

Nov. 15 Stamps 50.00 

Nov. 22 Stamps 100.00 

National Association, electros 1.00 

Nov. 30 IMrs. J. L. Spruill, November salary 54.60 

Dec. 7 National Association, bangles 58.81 

Stamps 50.00 

Dec. 13 Victor Animatograph Co., slides 15.29 

Dec. 28 Stamps 7500 

1921 

Jan. 1 A. W. Snow, December salary 125.00 

O. B. Revell, December salary 70.00 

M. L. Duncan, December salary 107.60 

L. Bouldin. December salary 50.00 

L. Mayhew, December salary 50.00 

S. Brabble, December salary 40.00 

Jan. 1 National Asso., mats, plates and bangles 146.33 

Jan. 13 National Asso., mats and plates 8.27 

Mrs. J. L.. Spruill, December salary 49.80 

Jan. 21 Stamps 25.00 

Feb. 1 Mrs. J. L. Spruill, January salary 45.90 

A. W. Snow, January salary 125.00 

O. B. Revell, January salary 70.00 

L. Bouldin, January salary 60.00 

L- Mayhew, January salary 50.00 

Sybil Brabble, January salary 40.00 

$ 5,937.62 

Excess appropriation used $ 2,937.62 

(b) 

Appropriation Account Dairy Equipment $ 647.50 

1920 

Mar. 18 Hackney Bros., wagon $ 273.35 

Balance appropriation 374.15 

$ 647.50 $ 647.50 

Unused balance $ 374.15 

(c) 

Appropriation account loan to X. C. Sanatorium for Occupa- 
tional Therapy building $ 7,000.00 

1920 

Mar. IS Harry F. Hann & Company $ 1,530.00 

April 10 Harry F. Hann & Company 1,530.00 

May 5 Harry F. Hann & Company 1,402.50 

June 5 Harry F. Hann & Company 545.00 

June 17 Harry F. Hann & Company 551.00 

Balance appropriation 1,441.50 

$ 7,000.00 7,000.00 

Unused balance $ 1,441.50 



58 



Annual Eepobt^ 1920 



(d) 

Appropriation Account Clinic Physician: 

Salary, $3,500; traveling expenses, $1,500; total $ 5,000.00 

1920 

May 1 J. L. Spruill, salary April $ 112.50 

May 18 J. E. Crayton, Physician's bag 17.50 

May 20 J. L. Spruill, expense April 43.80 

May 20 J. L. Spruill, expense May 50.00 

J. L. Spruill, part salary May 80.00 

June 1 J. L. Spruill, part salary and exp. May. . 80.97 

July 1 Board for family 80.00 

J. L. Spruill, salary June 150.00 

July 5 J. L. Spruill, expense June 96.35 

Aug. 2 J. L. Spruill, salary July 110.00 

Commercial Printing Co., posters 5.10 

Board family July 100.00 

Aug. 6 J. L. Spruill, expense July 80.17 

Sept. 1 J. L. Spruill, salary and exp. August.... 230.38 

Board family August and September 226.66 

Oct. 1 J. L. Spruill, salary September 83.34 

J. L. Spruill, expense September 70.20 

J. L. Spruill, expense Jacksonville meet. 69.25 

Nov. 1 J. L. Spruill, salary October 150.00 

Board family October • 80.00 

Nov. 30 J. L. Spruill, expense December 64.24 

Board family November SO. 00 

Dec. 2 J. L. Spruill, expense November 130.07 

Dec. 20 J. L. Spruill, salary and part exp. Nov. . . . 158.01 

J. L. Spruill, expense December 25.00 

1921 

Jan. 1 J. L. Spruill, salary December 150.00 

Board family December 80.00 

Feb. 1 J. L. Spruill, salary January 150.00 

Board family January 80.00 

Feb. 7 J. L. Spruill, expenses January 71.89 

Feb. 22 J. L. Spruill, expenses February 58.75 

Balance appropriation 2,035.82 

$ 5,000.00 5,000.00 

Unused balance $ 2,035.82 

(e) 

Appropriation Account scholarship for public health nursing. . . $ 1,000.00 

1920 

Mar. 27 Miss Alice B. Casey $ 100.00 

May 20 Miss Alice B. Casey 100.00 

Balance appropriation 800.00 

$ 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Unused balance $ 800.00 

(f) 

Appropriation to be used as revolving fund in payment of board 

and treatment for discharged tuberculous soldiers $ 2,500.00 

Not used. Balance appropriation $ 2,500.00 

$ 2,500.00 $ 2,500.00 

Unused appropriation $ 2,500.00 



l!«J'oRTH Carolina Tuberculosis Association 



59 



(g) 

Appropriation account, public health nursing, colored $ 1,000.00 

1920 

Mar. 27 Miss Blanche Hayes, Tarboro $ 75.00 

April 12 Miss Blanche Hayes, Tarboro 75.00 

May 1 Miss Blanche Hayes, Tarboro 75.00 

Balance appropriation 775.00 

$ 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Unused balance $ 775.00 

(h) 

Appropriation for additional X-Ray equipment at Sanatorium. . . $ 650.00 

Not used. Balance appropriation $ 650.00 

$ 650.00 650.00 

Unused appropriation $ 650.00 

(i) 

Appropriation to assist towns in establishing Public Health 

Nursing $ 1.000.00 

Not used. Balance appropriation $ 1,000.00 

$ 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Unused appropriation $ 1,000.00 

(J) 

Appropriation account moving picture car for negroes $ 5,000.00 

1920 

Mar. 20 C. W. Hyde, work on car ? 8.45 

April 2 Commercial Printing Co., posters 33.50 

April 10 E. T. Ranson, salary and exp. March 145.25 

May 17 E. T. Ranson, salary and exp. April 202.03 

June 19 E. T. Ranson, salary and exp. May 222.21 

June 23 Atlas Educational Film Co., trailers 23.53 

June 25 J. Bryan Grimes, license 12.50 

July 9 E'. T. Ranson, salary and exp. June 319.16 

July 12 State Board of Education, equipment 2,301.15 

Aug. 28 E. T. Ranson, salary and exp. July 346.67 

Sept. 16 E. T. Ranson, salary and exp. August 220.77 

Sept. 17 W. P. Crosby, lamp 13.00 

Sept. 22 O. B. Revell, exp. Edgecombe County 52.80 

Nov. 3 E. T. Ranson, salary and exp. September. 223.76 

Nov. 20 E. T. Ranson, salary and exp. October 387.77 

Nov. 30 E. T. Ranson, salary and exp. November. 217.08 

1921 

Jan. 7 E. T. Ranson, salary and exp. December. . 325.66 

Jan. 13 A. W. Snow, exp. to Raleigh 13.16 

Soper & Kaylor, repair Dodge 81.90 

Soper & Kaylor, Dodge frame 100.00 

Jan. 15 Bureau Community Service, equipment... 2,284.00 

Jan. 29 State Board of Education, tires 97.02 

Feb. 9 State Bd. Education, rep. movie machine. 7.75 

Feb. 17 E. T. Ranson, salary and exp. January... 188.30 

Feb. 21 Soper & Kaylor, repair Dodge 230.56 

State Board of Education, lamp 13.00 8,070.98 

Excess appropri&.tion used $ 3,070.98 



60 



Annual Report, 1920 



(k) 

Appropriation for negro health work $ 2,000.^0 

1920 

Mar. 5 Maggie Hester, salary $ 18.00 

Carrie Battle, salary . . . 10.00 

S. J. Martin, salary 10.00 

Laura J. A. King, salary 10.00 

April 14 M. C. Faulkner, salary 10.00 

May 20 B. M. Vincent, salary 60.00 

S. J. Wilson, salary 60.00 

E. J. Jones, salary 60.00 

Rachel Luten, salary 60.00 

Pearl Alston, salary 80.00 

L. B. Felton, salary 75.00 

E. N. Johnson, salary 70.00 

Annie E. Chesnutt, salary 65.00 

Mary Sutton, salary 70.00 

J. P. Murfree, salary 60.00 

Mattie N. Daye, salary 70.00 

C. W. McNeill, salary 75.00 

M. C. Faulkner, salary 90.00 

Maude M. Mitchell, salary 60.00 

Carrie Battle, salary 70.00 

Dollye B. Patterson, salary 70.00 

S. J. Martin, salary 70.00 

E. E. Haywood, salary 60.00 

Maggie Hester, salary 60.00 

M. A. C. Halliday, salary 60.00 

Laura J. A. King, salary 85.00 

M. J. Satterwhite, salary 70.00 

F. O. Butler, salary 80.00 

S. W. Randolph, salary 65.00 

Sarah J. McRae, salary 60.00 

Pearl E. Hoover, salary 70.00 

S. L. Smith, salary 70.00 

S. P. Wimberley, salary 70.00 

S. A. Wilson, salary 60.00 

Sadie P. Harris, salary 60.00 

E'. M. Thompson, salary 70.00 

Jennie L. Hill, salary 70.00 

R. J. Hargrave, salary 80.00 

J. I. Kornegay, salary 75.00 

Willa H. Berry, salary 80.00 

L. B. Yancey, salary 100.00 

Mary Garner, salary 90.00 

June 1 Laura J. A. King, salary 5.00 

Sadie P. Harris, salary 10.00 

M. M. Mitchell, salary 85.00 

S. L. Smith, salary 5.00 

S. W. Randolph, salary 15.00 

G. R. Whitfield, salary 90.00 

June 25 Sarah McRae, salary 10.00 

June 28 M. 0. Taylor, salary 75.00 

July 9 Marie Mclver, salary 60.00 

July 17 M. O. Taylor, salary 19.92 

July 28 Maggie Hester, salary 10.00 

Nov. 8 Hampton Normal Inst. Reprint 62.00 $ 3,104.92 

Excess appropriation used $ 1,104.92 



North Carolina TrBERCULOsis Association 



61 



(1) 

Appropriation Account Expense Directors' meeting % 1,000.00 

1920 

Mar. 18 Mrs. Charles R. Whitaker $ 69.99 

Balance appropriation 930.01 

$ 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Unused balance $ 930.01 

(m) 

Appropriation for purchase of moving picture films $ 1,250.00 

1920 

April 8 National Tuberculosis Asso. Jinks $ 100.00 

July 1 National Tuberculosis Asso. Jinks 103.64 

Dec. 7 National Tuberculosis Asso. Crusade 78.73 

Balance appropriation 967.63 

$ 1,250.00 1,250.00 

Unused balance $ 967.63 

(n) 

Appropriation Account Modern Health Crusade $ 1,000.00 

1920 

April 8 National Association supplies $ 95.11 

May 1 National Association supplies 20.00 

Aug. 2 National Association supplies 68.35 

Oct. 25 National Association supplies 236.79 

Nov. 4 N. C. Sanatorium, stamps 40.00 

Dec. 7 National Association supplies 366.02 

1921 

Feb. 9 National Association supplies 163.38 

Balance appropriation 10.35 

$ 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Unused balance $ 10.35 

(0) 

Appropriation Account Salary Executive Secretary $ 1,200.00 

1920 

April 17 L. B. McBrayer, salary $ 600.00 

1921 

Feb. 16 L. B. McBrayer, salary ' 600.00 

$ 1.20 0.00 1,200.00 

(P) 

Appropriation Account Miscellaneous Expense $ 700.00 

1920 

April 8 W. U. T. Company, March account 4.37 

Mar. 11 Roger Fibre Company, lantern cases 96.00 

April 2 American Ry. Exp. Co., March account... 3.62 

April 8 W. U. T. Company, March account 4.37 

April 18 National Association Publicity Service. . . 67.80 

May 1 American Ry. Exp. Co., April account 2.36 



62 



Annual Eepoet, 1920 



1920 




May 


1 


May 


4 


May 


18 


June 


14 


June 


15 


June 


23 


June 


23 


July 


2 


July 


6 


July 


12 


July 


28 


July 


28 


Aug. 


7 


Aug. 


9 


Aug. 


28 


Sept. 


2 


Sept. 


4 


Sept. 


7 


Sept. 


11 


Sept. 


14 


Sept. 


20 


Sept. 


29 


Sept. 


28 


Sept. 


4 


Sept. 


7 


Sept. 


7 


Sept. 


16 


Sept. 


22 


Oct. 


27 


Nov. 


9 


Nov. 


30 


Dec. 


7 


1921 




Dec. 


9 


Jan. 


3 


Jan. 


5 


Jan. 


13 


Jan. 


19 


Feb. 


1 


Feb. 


4 


Feb. 


7 


Nov. 


30 



National Association $ 7.00 

R. B. Wilson, exp. St. Louis 192.76 

Union Carbide Co., carbide 4.55 

Roger Fibre Co., lantern cases 96.00 

Victor Animatograph. Co., slides 18.39 

National Association, cuts 7.27 

Victor Animatograph Co., lanterns 349.75 

C. W. Hyde, repair to lantern 3.75 

Commercial Printing Co., bulletins 245.00 

A. C. Bulla, photo 3.00 

Stamps 20.00 

Stearns Engraving Co. eng. cut 11.00 

R. E. Luben, express slides 1.52 

W. U. T. Co., July account . .52 

Victor Animatograph Co., slides 9.19 

A. W. Snow, exp. Atlanta Conference 53.59 

J. Bryan Grimes, incorporation papers... 4.80 

W. L. Poole, recording incorp. papers.... 3.00 

Greensboro Daily News, ad 6.84 

Wilmington Star, ad 1.32 

Asheville Citizen, ad 3.00 

The Observer Company, ad 3.40 

The State Company, ad 3.90 

News and Observer, ad 4.68 

Pound & Moore, office supplies 5.10 

W. U. T. Co., August account 2.17 

F. C. Edwards, consult, re. pub. director. . 25.00 

F. M. Caldwell, bond 5.00 

Ruth Alexander, telephone call .90 

National Associati'on, membership 5.00 

American Ry. Exp., August account 9.94 

Ellington Studio, photographs 25.00 

Mrs. M. M. Finger, ex. Jacksonville meet. 67.00 

W. U. T. Co., September account 12.48 

R. B. Wilson, membersh'p National Asso. 5.00 

American Ry. Exp. Co., October account.. 11.61 

W. U. T. Co., October account .90 

W. U. T. Co., November account 25.55 

Victor Animatograph Co., slides 2.88 

American Ry. Exp. Co., December account 5.16 

Hac'mey & Moale Co., printing 19.30 

W. U. T. Co., December account 6.44 

Chicago Inst, post cards 58.50 

Vivian Jackson, Conference 10.75 

R. B. Wilson, Chicago meeting 221.65 

Stamps 20.00 

W. U. T. Co., January account 2.28 

Mrs. C. R. Whitaker, Jacksonville meeting 61.25 



$ 1,842.49 



Excess appropriation used $ 1,142,49 



North Carolina Tuberculosis Association 63 

Assets and Liabilities 

Checking Account on deposit, M. & F. Bank $ 4,380.27 

Saving Account, Merchants and Farmers Bank 10,000.00 

Due from North Carolina Sanatorium, loan made for Occupa- 
tional Therapy Building 5,558.50 

Due from North Carolina Sanatorium, loan made to pay Board 

and Treatment of Discharged Soldiers 3,187.00 

Due from loans made P. H. Nurse 300.00 

Due for Crusade Supplies 259.48 

Due from Local Chairmen 535.96 

Total assets $ 24,221.21 

5% due National Association on 1920 Seal Sale 1,836.42 

Net assets $ 22,384.79 



■J 



STATE LIBRARY OF NORTH CAROLINA^ 



3 3091 00747 1402